Editors

Harry Cassin
Publisher and Editor

Andy Spalding
Senior Editor

Jessica Tillipman
Senior Editor

Richard L. Cassin
Editor at Large

Elizabeth K. Spahn
Editor Emeritus

Cody Worthington
Contributing Editor

Julie DiMauro
Contributing Editor

Thomas Fox
Contributing Editor

Marc Alain Bohn
Contributing Editor

Bill Waite
Contributing Editor

Shruti J. Shah
Contributing Editor

Russell A. Stamets
Contributing Editor

Richard Bistrong
Contributing Editor

Eric Carlson
Contributing Editor

Bill Steinman
Contributing Editor

Elizabeth Spahn | Editor Emeritus

Elizabeth K. Spahn is is a contributing editor of the FCPA Blog.

She served as professor of law at New England Law | Boston from 1978 until 2014 where she taught anti-corruption law, constitutional law, first amendment law and employment law. She is currently Professor of Law Emerita.

She spent eighteen months as a Fulbright professor, lecturing on American constitutional law and employment law at Peking University Law School and the Beijing Foreign Studies University in China during 1999–2000. In 2005, she received a Fulbright senior specialist grant to lecture in Chongqing, China.

She has written and spoken extensively on international bribery, corruption, and money laundering, and on international women’s issues and on the development of Chinese law.

Her work has been featured in the Virginia Journal of International LawGeorgetown Journal of International Law, the Hofstra Law Review, the Minnesota Journal of International Law, the Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law, the American University Law Review, and the New England Law Review, among others, available from SSRN here.

Recent Posts

Friends and Enemies: When anti-graft campaigns become political weapons

Civil asset recovery actions against kleptocrats stashing their loot in luxury real estate abroad has become a hot new topic in the global anti-corruption movements with the publication of Public Wrongs, Private Actions. This handy guide empowers developing nations with realistic tools to hunt down the stolen assets secreted abroad. Civil lawsuits, unlike criminal cases, do not normally require dual criminality and are therefore often the best and only possible remedy.

Read More »

Taking back from the kleptocrats: Asset recovery burdens of proof

Image courtesy of the Stolen Asset Recovery InitiativeCivil, as opposed to criminal, asset forfeiture cases are the subject of heated debates in domestic U.S. law. Many civil libertarians and thoughtful observers of the U.S. legal system raise serious due process concerns when assets are taken without a prior criminal conviction. Civil cases are governed by lower procedural protections than criminal convictions that require proof beyond a reasonable doubt.

Read More »

French lessons: How about some strategic enforcement competition?

Even the most ardent Francophile, as I most assuredly am, must be dismayed by France’s abysmal record of bribery prosecutions. Recent OECD Anti-Bribery Convention Working Group reports reveal France’s inexorable zero. While France has contributed significantly to the global anti-corruption regime through its part in seizing Obiang family assets as well as referring evidence in the KBR cases to the U.S., nevertheless when it comes to prosecuting its own French based multinationals, France is failing.

Read More »

When Elites Cheat

It’s not who you know that is supposed to matter in a capitalist market. It’s what you know, and what you can do.

Read More »

Reclaiming Capitalism

We can reclaim the idea of capitalism: transparent, functioning, competitive markets where elites must earn money the old fashioned way.

Read More »