Skip to content

Editors

Harry Cassin
Publisher and Editor

Andy Spalding
Senior Editor

Jessica Tillipman
Senior Editor

Richard L. Cassin
Editor at Large

Elizabeth K. Spahn
Editor Emeritus

Cody Worthington
Contributing Editor

Julie DiMauro
Contributing Editor

Thomas Fox
Contributing Editor

Marc Alain Bohn
Contributing Editor

Bill Waite
Contributing Editor

Shruti J. Shah
Contributing Editor

Russell A. Stamets
Contributing Editor

Richard Bistrong
Contributing Editor

Eric Carlson
Contributing Editor

Bill Steinman
Contributing Editor

Andy Spalding: Here’s the ebook we wrote about Brazil’s anti-corruption triumph

Image courtesy of the University of Richmond Law SchoolThe University of Richmond Anti-Corruption Research Team is proud to announce the release of our ebook, “Olympic Anti-Corruption Report: Brazil and the Rio 2016 Games.”

The ebook, and many other resources, are now available on our web page, law.richmond.edu/olympics.

Though reports of Brazilian corruption now flood the papers, they miss this moment’s deeper significance. What appears to be a crisis is, in fact, a remarkable triumph for anti-corruption efforts, for the rule of law, and for democracy itself. We’ll explain why.

In the weeks leading up to the August 5 opening ceremonies, we’ll serially publish chapters of our report, and make available short videos summarizing our findings. You’ll also see a link to the Transparency International report on corruption in sport, to which we contributed a chapter.

But you’ll hear about all of it here on the FCPA Blog, where we’ll be writing regularly in the lead up to the Games.

The Olympic Games shed a spotlight on a country as few events can.  The world is already talking about Brazil, and that conversation will only escalate in the coming weeks. Since the mid-1990s, when the Salt Lake City 2002 Winter Games bid scandal broke, the pre-Olympic chatter has invariable turned to issues of corruption. It certainly did for Sochi and Russia, and it already has for Brazil. We hope to bring some sophistication and, dare we say, a measure of optimism, to the conversation.

The University of Richmond Anti-Corruption Research Team is a group of eight lawyers, all graduates of UR Law. While students, they took my year-long course, “Brazil, Corruption, and the 2016 Summer Olympics.” We traveled to Brazil and interviewed various representatives of the Olympic movement, the bar, and civil society. All eight team members contributed substantially to the analysis and writing contained in our report.

We hope to challenge everything you now assume about Brazil, and the Olympic Games.  Stay tuned.

____

Andy Spalding is a Senior Editor of the FCPA Blog and Associate Professor at the University of Richmond School of Law. He’ll be a moderator and panelist at the FCPA Blog NYC Conference 2016.

Share this post

LinkedIn
Facebook
Twitter

2 Comments

  1. Great article and first chapters of the book. I am looking forward to more. But please let the writers know that the 1972 Olympic games were not in Berlin but in Munich instead

  2. Great initiative!

    As Brazilian, I am proud of having our country being shown in a positive way, as an example of fighting against corruption. However, I would say that is the beginning of a new culture and a new country. I don't think that we can consider as a "triumph" yet. We should wait for the effective results of everything that is under investigation.


Comments are closed for this article!